map

1430 SE 3RD AVENUE, No.100
PORTLAND, OR 97214
get directions

office

{503}
221 3090

Friday, December 13, 2013

Thank Grimm It’s Friday: 2-Hour Fall Finale

by ranielle

Don’t miss the exciting 2-hour fall finale of “Grimm“, starting at 9PM tonight on NBC.
First up, catch these Pacific Northwest actors in “Cold Blooded”:
Christian Lagadec, Damien Puckler, Jared Miller, Robin Langford, Gary Cash, Ernie Joseph, Marcel Davis, Nate Scholz, Tyler Miles, Lyssa Browne, John Srednicki.
Christian Lagadec, Damien Puckler, Jared Miller, Robin Langford, Gary Cash, Ernie Joseph, Marcel Davis, Nate Scholz, Tyler Miles, Lyssa Browne, John Srednicki.
Then stay for the exciting conclusion, “Twelve Days of Krampus”, with these Pacific Northwest actors:
Danny Bruno, Christian Lagadec, Damien Puckler, Jared Miller, Robin Langford, Darius Pierce, Alex Mentzel, Stephanie Meyer, Nikki Weaver, Rick Espaillat, Quinn Allan, Naia Schroder, Gary Taylor, Hank Cartwright, Sophie Gajowskyj, Jerry Basham, Megan Keller, Hardy Awadjie, Michael Grant.
Danny Bruno, Christian Lagadec, Damien Puckler, Jared Miller, Robin Langford, Darius Pierce, Alex Mentzel, Stephanie Meyer, Nikki Weaver, Rick Espaillat, Quinn Allan, Naia Schroder, Gary Taylor, Hank Cartwright, Sophie Gajowskyj, Jerry Basham, Megan Keller, Hardy Awadjie, Michael Grant.
All new episodes of “Grimm” return in January!
Friday, November 29, 2013

Thank Grimm It’s Friday: “El Cucuy”

by ranielle

Don’t miss these Pacific Northwest actors on “Grimm“ tonight at 9PM on NBC.
Christian Lagadec, Robert Blanche, Damien Puckler, Brenda Braxton, Macall Gordon, Juan Aleman, Fernanda Stier, Carter Rodriquez, Jon Bebe, Thomas Gleicher, Michele Mariana, Olga Sanchez.
Christian Lagadec, Robert Blanche, Damien Puckler, Brenda Braxton, Macall Gordon, Juan Aleman, Fernanda Stier, Carter Rodriquez, Jon Bebe, Thomas Gleicher, Michele Mariana, Olga Sanchez.
Wednesday, November 27, 2013

Urgent Casting Call: Grimm seeking Filipino Talent

by admin

Cast Iron Studios is seeking Northwest-based Filipino talent for on-camera principal (speaking) roles an upcoming episode of NBC’s Grimm.

UPDATE 12/4/13: Casting is closed! Thanks so much to all who applied. We can’t wait to see how the episode turns out!

grimm_title

If you fit the specifications below and are available for the shoot dates, please submit the following to talent[at]castironstudios.com (replace [a] with @):

  1. Full Name
  2. Phone Number
  3. Picture (should be current and clear)

Filipino Men, ages 30-50, MUST SPEAK TAGALOG
Filipino Women, age 60+, MUST SPEAK TAGALOG

PLEASE NOTE: These roles are for OREGON LOCAL HIRES.

Casting will be Tuesday, December 3rd or Wednesday, December 4th in Portland, OR.

Shoot will be for one or more days between December 11-20, 2013 in Portland – MUST be able to fully clear schedule for shoot dates.

No phone calls or drop-by visits. Thanks!

Please share!

Monday, November 25, 2013

11 Tips for Monologue-Challenged Actors

by admin

Lana’s latest expert column, courtesy of Backstage.

Lana Veenker CSAEach December, our casting company joins others across the country to host a Meals for Monologues event. Anyone and everyone can be seen by our casting directors in exchange for a few cans of food. Actors are given two-minute time slots, during which they can perform one or two monologues of their choosing. We have a blast discovering new faces—and new facets to actors we already know—and our local food bank reaps the benefit.

Do you dread monologues? You’re not alone. Since we typically use sides in auditions during the year, many actors fret about what to prepare and what to expect. Let these tips transform your monologue from a loathsome chore into a mini-performance.

1. Find out what types of pieces are acceptable. Should you do one monologue or two contrasting ones? Classic or contemporary? Serious or comedic? How long is your time slot? Will you be asked to sing? (In our case, we request contemporary monologues, since we rarely cast period pieces or musicals.)

2. Know whom you are auditioning for and what types of projects they cast. What are the names of the people behind the table? Can you find their photos online so that you recognize them upon arrival? What are they currently casting and what do they typically cast? Knowing your audience will help you select an appropriate piece.

3. Choose a monologue that features you in a role you might easily be cast in. If you’re a young leading man type, don’t attempt King Lear or Caliban. Choose something in your wheelhouse, especially if you’re just starting out. Help the casting director picture you in a suitable, age-appropriate role. Don’t make their job more difficult.

4. Or, go against type to demonstrate your range. If you’re an experienced actor always getting called in for the same types of characters, try mixing things up. If casting directors only think of you for comedic parts, knock their socks off with a poignant, dramatic piece. Nail it, and you just may renew a casting director’s enthusiasm about your work.

5. Avoid monologues you’ve written yourself—unless you’re really, really good. Performing your own material is risky. Casting directors may focus on the quality of your writing, instead of your acting. They may assume you haven’t been hired on any real projects, that you have problems memorizing others’ material, or even that you may be difficult to work with. Keep the casting directors focused on your performance, not wondering why you didn’t choose a published piece. If you do present your own work, make sure it’s flawless, and don’t say you wrote it when you slate. Just state the title and role you’re playing and jump in. If they love it, you can always reveal the author’s identity afterwards. (Wink, wink!)

6. Read the whole script. This goes without saying. Give yourself the best chance by understanding your role in its full context. Even if you find a piece in a book of monologues, go back and read the original script as you research your character.

7. Know your monologue backwards, forwards, and inside and out. Nerves on audition day are par for the course so be sure that you’re fully prepared and that the monologue is so much a part of you that you could improvise the whole thing, if need be. Just found out about the audition and your monologue isn’t entirely polished? Better to wait for the next opportunity. You don’t want the casting director’s first impression to be you going up on your lines.

8. Time your monologue precisely. Choose pieces that run a little short of your allotted time. Practice performing them with a stopwatch to make sure you don’t go over. It’s no fun to have the casting director interrupt you mid-sentence to inform you that time’s up.

9. At the audition, state your name clearly, along with the title, role, and writer’s name. When entering the audition space, don’t be so nervous that you launch right into your monologue without an introduction. Let the auditors know who you are and what you’ll be performing. Allow your personality to shine through during your slate, demonstrating the fun and positive human being that you are. Smile and gain your poise. Those first few seconds are critical.

10. Own the space and think of it as a performance. Once you begin your monologue, forget about it being an audition. Claim the space and invite the audience into your world, as if it were a real performance. (It actually is.) We want to be moved, entertained, and drawn into the story. Strut your stuff!

11. If time runs out before you finish, end gracefully. If your audition runs long and someone calls “TIME!” don’t get flustered, angry, or apologetic. Simply stop, break into a huge smile, say thank you, and exit confidently. Going over won’t damage your employment prospects, but having a meltdown in front of the CD might.

Link to original article.

Casting Director Lana Veenker began her career in London and, upon returning to her Northwest roots, founded one of the top location casting companies in the country.

Recent projects include “Wild,” starring Reese Witherspoon, NBC’s “Grimm,” now in its third season, and 64 episodes of TNT’s “Leverage.” Gus Van Sant, Robert Benton, Guillermo Arriaga, Catherine Hardwicke and Tim Robbins figure among past film clients. Commercial accounts include Nike, Apple and Nintendo, and international campaigns from Shanghai to Santiago.

Lana is a member of the Casting Society of America and the International Casting Directors Network. She frequently lectures across the U.S. and abroad, most recently at the Finnish Actors’ Union in Helsinki, Amsterdam School of the Arts, The Actors Platform in London, The Acting Studio in Berlin, Studio Bleu in Paris and Prague Film School.

Complete her survey to be entered into a contest for a free career consultation here.

She has been featured in The Hollywood Reporter, USA Today, MSNBC.com, MTV.com, AccessHollywood.com, and Wired, among others. Follow her on Twitter @lanaveenker.

Monday, November 18, 2013

3rd Annual Meals for Monologues – UPDATED

by ranielle

Third time’s a charm!  We here at Cast Iron Studios are firm believers in giving back, especially during the holiday season.  We’re happy to announce our third annual “Meals for Monologues” canned food drive-slash-holiday potluck.

Meals for Monologues
Food Drive Benefiting

&
Holiday Meet-n-Greet Potluck
with

Wednesday, December 11, 2013
10:00 AM to 6:00 PM*

1430 SE 3rd Ave, Suite 100
Portland, OR 97214

2 OR 3 NON-PERISHABLES GET YOU SEEN BY A CASTING DIRECTOR

Actors from far and wide, you’re invited to come to our offices for an open general audition call, where you can be seen by a casting director in exchange for two or three** non-perishable food items benefiting the Oregon Food Bank.

  • Bring HEADSHOT & RESUME (stapled back-to-back or resume printed on back of photo)
  • Perform a short, prepared monologue (or two!) of your own choosing.
  • Choose a contemporary piece (we just don’t cast much Shakespeare).
  • Audition slots are 2 MINUTES MAX, so make the best use of your time!
  • No appointment necessary.  No phone calls.  One day only.  First come, first served.
  • Barrels will be in our office December 5-17, for those unable to attend/donate on the day.

HOLIDAY MEET-N-GREET POTLUCK

Before or after you read for one of our casting directors—or even if you’re not auditioning and just want to say hi—feel free to bring an appetizer, potluck dish or dessert treat and have a bite at this unique holiday party & open house.

If you’re a regular at our office, please consider leaving the audition spots open for others and simply come for the party. We’d love to see you!

*No auditions will take place 12PM-12:30PM or 4PM-4:30PM to give Casting Directors a short break to stretch, eat, and say hello outside of the studio.

**We’re looking to crack 1,000 lbs of food this year.  Let’s make this year even bigger than the last two!

Spread the word!  You can join our event on Facebook.

UPDATE: NEW IN 2013!

Not in Portland, but still want to audition? We will accept demo reels or self-tapes from out-of-town actors who are Oregon local hires (meaning you have a physical address in Oregon and/or are repped by an Oregon talent agency), in exchange for a screenshot of your donation to the Oregon Food Bank (minimum $10). Submission must be received by December 10th to guarantee viewing by our casting directors. See instructions below.

NEW! SELF-TAPE SUBMISSION INSTRUCTIONS FOR OUT-OF-TOWN ACTORS

  • You must be an OREGON LOCAL HIRE to submit for this general audition.
  • Self-taped monologue or professional demo reel must be no longer than TWO MINUTES.
  • If self-taping, be sure you are framed in a CLOSE-UP (head and shoulders), with good lighting and sound. Typically, you would direct your lines to the side of camera, not directly into the lens (it may help to use a real human off-camera).
  • Submission MUST be a LINK to view your video online, NOT a FILE attached to your email. Upload your video to Vimeo, YouTube or a similar platform and send us the direct URL only. Emails containing video attachments will be deleted.
  • You may password-protect your video, but be sure to send us the password with your submission.
  • Go to http://oregonfoodbank.org/donatenow to make your donation ($10 is the minimum accepted online by the Food Bank).
  • Please list “Meals for Monologues” in the Name, Event or Occasion text box on the donation form.
  • Please send a screenshot or PDF of your donation receipt with your submission.
  • You may include one headshot and resume (or a link to an online casting profile) with your submission.
  • Include your name, contact information, and city where you are currently based.
  • Please confirm in your email that you are a local hire, either because you have a physical address in Oregon or are repped by an Oregon talent agent or manager.
  • Email submission to talent[at]castironstudios.com, subject heading: M4M Local Hire. (Replace [a] with @ in the email address.)
  • Deadline for self-tape submissions is December 10, 2013 at 11:59 PM PST. We cannot guarantee your video will be watched if received after the deadline.
Friday, November 8, 2013

Thank Grimm It’s Friday: “A Dish Best Served Cold”

by ranielle

Don’t miss these Pacific Northwest actors on “Grimm“ tonight at 9PM on NBC.
Danny Bruno, Christian Lagadec, George Castillo, George Mount, Ashley Whittaker, Patricia Ferguson, Christine Alexander, Jasmin Brown, Sam Wilson, Chad Evans, Jonas Grosserhode, Maxwell Nightser, Nathan Will.
Danny Bruno, Christian Lagadec, George Castillo, George Mount, Ashley Whittaker, Patricia Ferguson, Christine Alexander, Jasmin Brown, Sam Wilson, Chad Evans, Jonas Grosserhode, Maxwell Nightser, Nathan Will.
Friday, November 1, 2013

Thank Grimm It’s Friday: “PTZD”

by ranielle

Don’t miss these Pacific Northwest actors on “Grimm“ tonight at 9PM on NBC.
1st row: Mary McDonald-Lewis, Damien Puckler, Jim Iorio, Gregory Marks. 2nd row: Steve Alderfer, Darcy Miller, Cameron Kolkemo, Delaney Hagfeldt.
1st row: Mary McDonald-Lewis, Damien Puckler, Jim Iorio, Gregory Marks. 2nd row: Steve Alderfer, Darcy Miller, Cameron Kolkemo, Delaney Hagfeldt.
Friday, October 25, 2013

Thank Grimm It’s Friday: “The Ungrateful Dead”

by ranielle

He’s ba-ack!  Don’t miss these Pacific Northwest actors on the season premiere of “Grimm“ tonight at 9PM on NBC.
1st row: Christian Lagadec, Robert Blanche, Jean-Luc Boucherot, Kamyar Jahan. 2nd row: Jason Newell, Keith Jordan, Mary McDonald-Lewis, John Srednicki. 3rd row: Jim Lykins, Ian Bell, Michael Agostini. 4th row: Steve Alderfer, Darcy Miller, Cameron Kolkemo, Delaney Hagfeldt.
1st row: Christian Lagadec, Robert Blanche, Jean-Luc Boucherot, Kamyar Jahan. 2nd row: Jason Newell, Keith Jordan, Mary McDonald-Lewis, John Srednicki. 3rd row: Jim Lykins, Ian Bell, Michael Agostini. 4th row: Steve Alderfer, Darcy Miller, Cameron Kolkemo, Delaney Hagfeldt.
Wednesday, September 18, 2013

“Wild” Feature Film Casting Call

by ranielle

Wild Films, Inc. is looking for talent to fill a number of roles for the feature film “Wild”, based on the memoir by Cheryl Strayed and starring Reese Witherspoon.

CIS Logo

Interested talent must be based in Oregon or Washington, able to work as a local in Portland, and be available for an audition on Friday, September 20, 2013 in Portland and a possible callback on Tuesday, September 24, 2013 in Portland.  Shoot dates are October 5 through November 25, 2013 (though roles will likely only work one day in that date range).

KYLE
Boy, 5-8 years old.  MUST HAVE A BEAUTIFUL BOY SOPRANO SINGING VOICE!  A solemn, somewhat odd child, he’s walking on the trail with his grandmother, Vera, as they go looking for their lost llama, who’s managed to find Cheryl.  He speaks in a rather formal, proper manner, telling Cheryl that his grandmother is looking after him because “I have some big problems that I don’t want to talk about with strangers.”  Kyle seems to take to Cheryl, and sings a song for her—The Red River Valley—beautifully and with feeling.  Auditioning children should be prepared to sing a portion of The Red River Valley.

TATTOOIST
Male or Female, 30s to early 40s.  Heavily inked tattoo artist doing matching tattoos on Cheryl and Paul is startled to learn that they’re getting a divorce, and tries to do a little marriage counseling.

DREADLOCKED YOUNG MAN
Male, 20s.  This angry guy in dreadlocks storms out of the Ashland Oregon Post Office, furious at his treatment by the woman behind the counter.

Wardrobe for all roles: Casual
Rate for all roles: SAG-AFTRA Scale

Qualified talent who fit the above specs should attend our OPEN CALL:

OPEN CASTING CALL
Friday, September 20, 2013
3:00PM-6:00PM
Cast Iron Studios
1430 SE 3rd Ave, Suite 100, Portland 97214

Thursday, September 12, 2013

7 Things To Do If You Think You’ve Been Blacklisted

by admin

Think you’ve been blacklisted by a casting office? Here are a few things to consider from the casting side. Lana’s latest column, courtesy of Backstage.

Lana Veenker CSAIn response to my article, 10 Tips for Surviving a Bad Audition, an actor I know sent us this (edited) message:

You speak of a “next time.” What if it takes an actor literally years to get another opportunity to audition? If an actor blows it in 2009 and hasn’t been called in for a decent role since—in spite of keeping up with classes, losing weight, keeping a current look and headshots to match, in spite of lots of self-reflection and therapy, in spite of doing all the things you recommend, but still can’t get a foot in the door anymore—what then? I would love to hear your thoughts about how an actor can survive being blacklisted, and advice on how to redeem oneself. Thanks!

Surprised that she thought our office had blacklisted her, we contacted her for further information. She described a disastrous appearance on a show we’d cast her in a few years back, and thought that we’d stopped calling her due to bad reports from production. She lamented having only had four auditions in four years, and regretted having fallen out of our graces.

It was enlightening to hear her side of the story, and easy to see how she had come to this interpretation of events. We appreciated her candor. The funny thing was, we didn’t consider the actor blacklisted at all!

Her message taught us a few things about how the casting process feels from the actor’s side. Here are a few things to consider from the casting side.

1. Are you sure you’ve been blacklisted? We never heard a peep from production regarding this actor’s performance. As far as we knew, she’d done a great job. And she had a memorable turn in a feature film we cast a while back, so for us, there was no problem! (See also Tip #5 on blunders from my last article.)

2. Find out if you’re really to blame before you start blaming yourself. Sometimes productions and casting sessions themselves are stressful, disorganized, and rife with conflict. Actors may be unaware of the climate they’re walking into and blame themselves when tensions flare.

3. Try not to take things so personally. It’s not always about you. Not long after I started casting, an actor I knew to be talented seemed very nervous in the audition room. When I asked if everything was okay, she burst into tears, saying that we hadn’t called her in to read a single time since her first audition for me six months prior. She thought she’d been blacklisted.

The truth was, I had only just opened up shop, and had hardly landed any casting jobs myself during that period. It wasn’t that her first reading was terrible. It was that I was unemployed!

4. Consider other possible reasons why the phone may have stopped ringing. These are not in any way directed at the actors above, but are general reasons why an actor may not be getting called in.

We love you, but…

Things are dead around the casting office.
We’re casting a film and there are no roles in the script for your type.
We’re casting only one TV series, and you’ve already appeared on it.
We’re casting mostly non-union gigs, and you’re union.
We’re casting mostly union gigs, and you’re non-union.
You’ve moved into a new category (due to age, weight, etc.) that’s harder to find roles for.
You were on the audition shortlist, only to be bumped off due to the limited number of timeslots.
You were on the schedule, until your agent informed us that you were unavailable.
You’re going up against really stiff competition and didn’t make the cut. (Sorry!)
You’re too good for the small parts, so we’re holding out for the right opportunity.
You’ve come in too frequently in a short amount of time and clients want to see new faces.
You’ve been off your game recently, so we’re giving others an opportunity while you get your head back together. We’ll circle back.
You’re too green. We’re waiting for you to gain more experience before we call you back in.
A specific client has irrationally decided they don’t like you. We’re waiting to be working with new clients, so we can start bringing you in again.
We’re simply unaware that you haven’t been in in a while. It’s hard to keep track!

5. If you’re pretty sure things have gone awry, ask your reps to do some sleuthing. A quick call from their reps to the casting director’s office could have quelled these actors’ fears and saved them a considerable amount of stress. It would have also brought their circumstances to our attention, so we could make sure we weren’t unintentionally overlooking them. (I generally would not recommend an actor inquire directly with casting, but to use an intermediary to neutralize the info.)

6. Let it go. Positive you made a bad impression somewhere along the way? Make amends through your agent—if they think it’s a good idea—shake the dust off, and let it go. Maintain a positive attitude and look towards the future.

7. Show them what you’re really made of. Early in my career, after messing up on a casting job, a producer told me, “You’ll never work in this town again!” I’ve proven her wrong several hundred times. You can do the same. Just keep getting better.

Focus on your craft. Go out and get some new credits. Produce and star in your own movie or web series. Keep honing your skills. Concentrate on your marketing and training. Remind casting directors that you’re actively pursuing your career and getting work. Make them want to find out what all the fuss is!

Link to original article.

Casting Director Lana Veenker began her career in London and, upon returning to her Northwest roots, founded one of the top location casting companies in the country.

Recent projects include NBC’s Grimm, now in its third season, and 64 episodes of TNT’s Leverage. Gus Van Sant, Robert Benton, Guillermo Arriaga, Catherine Hardwicke and Tim Robbins figure among past film clients. Commercial accounts include Nike, Apple and Nintendo, and international campaigns from Shanghai to Santiago.

Lana is a member of the Casting Society of America and the International Casting Directors Network. She frequently lectures across the U.S. and abroad, most recently at the Finnish Actors’ Union in Helsinki, Amsterdam School of the Arts, The Actors Platform in London, The Acting Studio in Berlin, Studio Bleu in Paris and Prague Film School.

Complete her survey to be entered into a contest for a free career consultation here.

She has been featured in The Hollywood Reporter, USA Today, MSNBC.com, MTV.com, AccessHollywood.com, and Wired, among others. Follow her on Twitter @lanaveenker.

Thursday, September 5, 2013

Casting for Success: Lana Veenker to speak at Marylhurst University

by admin

Lana Veenker will be the keynote speaker at Marylhurst University’s Celebration Brunch on Sunday, October 20, 2013 as part of its Reunion Weekend.

The event is open to the public. Come join us!

Casting for Success: Shapeshifting a Hollywood Career from Oregon and Beyond

Sunday, October 20, 2013
11 am – 12:45 pm
Salon, Flavia Hall, Marylhurst University Campus

Tickets: $30*/35 per person (includes brunch buffet)
*Early bird registration: $30 per person. Deadline September 27.

>> Download flier

Celebration Brunch featuring guest speaker Lana Veenker

CAL-speaker-lana-veenker

Founder and president of Cast Iron Studios Lana Veenker has worked with Hollywood’s top producers, actors and directors on major television series (Grimm, Leverage) and blockbuster movies (Twilight), often without braving Los Angeles traffic and smog.

From her first job as a casting assistant in London to her current position as the president of Cast Iron Studios in Portland, Oregon, Veenker has launched a rewarding career in a creative, green and increasingly global industry that, thanks to technology and film legislation, no longer requires a Hollywood ZIP code in order to succeed.

In her address, Veenker will provide insights and anecdotes on her career in casting, explain why Oregon has become a hotspot for film and television production and explore career prospects in media and advertising.

With more than 20 years of experience in the entertainment industry, Veenker’s credits span the globe. Before founding Cast Iron Studios (formerly Lana Veenker Casting) in 1999, she acted in France, England and Venezuela, lived in India and the West Indies, and helped hire European leads for major studios and networks as part of a London casting office. As a member of the International Casting Directors Network (ICDN) and the Casting Society of America (CSA), Lana maintains strong partnerships worldwide. She speaks French and Spanish, and frequently lectures in the United States and abroad. In a single week, she’s been known to sway legislators with compelling arguments for Oregon’s film incentives, fly to Paris to produce a staged reading and top-rope up the side of an Austrian WWII anti-aircraft tower.

Link to original post.

Thursday, August 1, 2013

Writers, Writers Everywhere

by ranielle

As August (!?) commences, our call for screenplays draws to a close (at least for now).  With over ONE HUNDRED submissions, our work is cut out for us as we continue to read, review, and evaluate.

As a writer myself, I know well the arduous task of putting pen to paper or fingers to keyboard and how much harder it can be sometimes to get from the beginning, to the middle, and to that holy grail — THE END.

Thank you and kudos to everyone who submitted!

Thursday, August 1, 2013

Honoring the Memory of Jack Featheringill

by admin

Jack photo

UPDATE ON 8/1: NEW VENUE AND DATE FOR CELEBRATION

At 8:28 p.m. on July 3, 2013, our beloved friend, mentor, director, PSU Professor Emeritus and Drammy committee member Jack Featheringill passed away peacefully from complications that developed after open heart surgery on Tuesday, July 2. Link to full Oregonian obituary.

A Celebration of Life is being planned for Jack on August 19th, 2013 at 7:00 PM at Artists Repertory Theatre, 1515 SW Morrison Street, Portland, OR 97205.

To accommodate expected turnout, Jack’s Celebration of Life will now take place on August 26th, 2013 at 7:00 PM at Portland Center Stage, 128 NW 11th Avenue, Portland, OR 97209.

Friends and colleagues would like to thank both PCS and Artists Rep for their generosity.

The celebration will include a display of memorabilia, a short spoken program, a slide show, hors d’oeuvres and a toast to Jack. In addition, PCS Armory Café will provide food and beverage for purchase.

Please RSVP here. If you would like to submit a story or comment for his memory book, please follow the instructions on the form.

In lieu of flowers, please make donations to CASA in Jack’s name.

Marvelous, irreplaceable Jack: you will be sorely missed, but your legacy is enormous. Dec 4, 1931 – July 3, 2013.

Below is the press release:

From Broadway to PSU: Commemorating Local Theater Legend Jack Featheringill

Celebration of Life will take place on August 26th at Portland Center Stage

 

PORTLAND, ORE. Although the most passionate man in the Portland theater community passed away on July 3, his influence on actors, directors, writers, and stage technicians will endure for years to come. In recognition of the many contributions of Professor Emeritus Jack Featheringill, his friends and colleagues are hosting a celebration of his life on August 26, 2013 at Portland Center Stage.

Before Jack became a theater professor—and, ultimately, the department chair—at Portland State University, he enjoyed a 15-year career on Broadway. Under the name Jack Leigh, he danced with Ethel Merman and Judy Garland, was choreographed by George Balanchine, and performed in several Broadway musicals. Working with such notables as Jerome Robbins and Hal Prince, he was also a casting director, a stage manager, and a dance captain. He cast the original Broadway production of Fiddler on the Roof with Bette Midler, and was a dancer in the movie The Music Man.

After Broadway, Jack returned to his alma mater, Indiana University, where he earned a Master of Arts in Theater. Hired by PSU in 1970, he remained in the Theater Arts department for three decades. Jack was three-time recipient of the American College Theatre Festival’s Award of Excellence for his direction of productions presented at the Kennedy Center: Misanthrope (1972), Equus (1978), and Waltz of the Toreadors (1983). Also during his tenure, he ran a summer stock program at Cannon Beach’s Coaster Theatre.

“Jack lived the most amazing life,” said Casting Director Lana Veenker, a close friend and former student helping to organize the celebration. “I would not be where I am today without his influence and ongoing support.” Veenker went on to found Cast Iron Studios, the Oregon casting company on Twilight, TNT’s Leverage and NBC’s Grimm.

Other former students include Portland Actors’ Conservatory Artistic Director Beth Harper, Screenwriter and NBCUniversal Story Analyst Douglas Soesbe, Stage Manager Clair Callaway, Actress, Writer and Director Victoria Parker-Pohl, and several founding members of The 3rd Floor sketch comedy troupe. Jack also directed numerous theater productions in Portland over the years, coaching and collaborating with two generations of actors and stage crews.

Upon retirement, Jack committed his life to helping others, working as an ombudsman for eldercare, a counselor on a substance-abuse hotline, and a Court-Appointed Special Advocate (CASA) for neglected and abused children. From 2007 through 2013, Jack advocated for his “CASA kids” with the same fierce passion and commitment he brought to teaching and directing.

Jack’s love for local theater, however, was ongoing. He was involved with the creation of Portland’s Drammy Awards (initially the Willy Awards) and received the Drammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 2004. He served on the Drammy Committee from 1978 to 1993 and from 2005 until a few weeks before his death.

The Celebration of Life for Jack Featheringill will take place at 7:00 PM on August 26, 2013 at Portland Center Stage, 128 NW 11th Avenue, Portland, OR 97209.

In lieu of flowers, please make donations to CASA in Jack’s name.

To submit a story for Jack’s memory book and to RSVP, please click here.

##

Thursday, July 18, 2013

URGENT CASTING CALL: EXTRAS FOR UNION SHOOT

by admin

**********URGENT, LAST MINUTE CASTING CALL**********

EXTRAS FOR UNION SHOOT TOMORROW, JULY 18TH
IN THE DALLES

Need 3-4 guys and gals, ages 21-33, in generally GOOD SHAPE, FUN and ATTRACTIVE.

Shoot is in The Dalles, OR and may run all day, so your schedule must be totally clear.

We can’t disclose the client online, but can privately.

The job is union, so talent can be union or willing to be Taft-Hartleyed, and the rate is overscale at $200 (plus travel expenses).

Who’s got tomorrow free to go have fun and make some money?

Please email a CURRENT PICTURE with your CELL PHONE NUMBER to eryn@castironstudios.com ASAP.

We’ll be booking talent TONIGHT (Wednesday, July 17th) and you’ll be on your way tomorrow, bright and early. Wheeeee!

Share! Share! Share!

Wednesday, July 17, 2013

10 Tips for Surviving a Bad Audition

by admin

Lana’s latest column, courtesy of Backstage!

Lana Veenker CSASo you tanked that big, important audition? Hang in there. Here is some advice to help lessen the pain.

1. Are you sure you blew it? I’ve often heard actors say, “I was terrible. I can’t believe I booked the job.” I’ve also heard them say, “Why didn’t they hire me? I thought I’d nailed it.” Countless elements of the final casting decisions have no relation to your read so don’t sweat it. It’s very possible that you did just fine.

2. Let it go. If you’re sure your audition was a stinker, don’t beat yourself up. We all have good days and bad. If you have a solid track record, it’s unlikely to affect your future prospects. Even if it was your first audition for a particular casting director and you really bombed it, they may not even remember a few months down the road. (I can rarely recall auditions from one week to the next—good or bad. There’s not enough brain space to retain that much data over time.)

3. Analyze it. Instead of a pity party, see if you can objectively analyze what went wrong. Did your nerves get the best of you? Figure out what to do next time to stay more centered. Were you rusty? Maybe it’s time to get back into a cold-reading class. Was it the part? Some roles you just can’t connect with, even if you’ve learned the lines and figured out your intentions. So be it.

4. Keep an audition log. Make it your practice to keep an audition log so you can detect patterns, identify what works, and repeat the experience. How can you recreate conditions that lead to successful reads? Psyching yourself into the right mood? Getting a good night’s sleep? Leaving a few minutes earlier, so you’re not circling the block looking for parking when you should be getting centered?

5. Don’t draw unnecessary attention to your blunders. No one may have noticed that you messed up your lines or that your head wasn’t in the scene. I’ve received apologies from actors outlining all the ways they failed their audition, when I hadn’t particularly noticed. Sure, it may not have been their best read, but I hadn’t perceived it as a massive failure—until they assured me it was.

6. Start over. If you recognize early in your read that things are going downhill, stop immediately and say, “Hang on, I’m starting again.” Wait a beat for the camera operator to reset the shot, then start over without a fuss.

7. Don’t start over late in your read, though. Instead, use Michael Shurtleff’s “blame or give” strategy, from his classic book “Audition: Everything You Need to Know to Get the Part,” to radically change direction and jolt yourself out of it. Shurtleff writes, “Use whatever words the script provides you at the moment of need to create an outburst of blame that will rock your partner off her feet. Then, if you feel so bad about unleashing your wrath upon an innocent partner, follow it with a total, unexpected opposite: You can make up for your dreadful conduct of falsely blaming her by offering her your love.”

8. Read “Audition.” If you haven’t read Shurtleff’s book, pick it up immediately.

9. Ask for a second read. After a disastrous read, you can always try and ask for a second one, if you’re confident you can do better. You may not get the opportunity, but if the casting director says, “Sure, go ahead,” make this take significantly different from your first. There’s nothing worse than sitting through a mediocre audition, only to have to sit through the same one a second time. Take a moment to focus, renew your resolve, or do whatever you need to ensure your second read is the audition you had in mind when you entered the room.

10. Don’t let it affect your work. Remember this: An actor who continues to improve his or her craft will ultimately not be affected by a few less-than-perfect performances. I messed up early in my career on a casting job or two, due to inexperience or nerves. Over the years, the same producers—most of whom scarcely recall my early gaffes—have hired me again. Keep perfecting your skills, and each experience will build on the previous one. And if one of your reads doesn’t go so well, be grateful for the accelerated learning opportunity that mistakes provide.

Casting Director Lana Veenker began her career in London and, upon returning to her Northwest roots, founded one of the top location casting companies in the country.

Recent projects include NBC’s Grimm, now in its third season, and 64 episodes of TNT’s Leverage. Gus Van Sant, Robert Benton, Guillermo Arriaga, Catherine Hardwicke and Tim Robbins figure among past film clients. Commercial accounts include Nike, Apple and Nintendo, and international campaigns from Shanghai to Santiago.

Lana is a member of the Casting Society of America and the International Casting Directors Network. She frequently lectures across the U.S. and abroad, most recently at the Finnish Actors’ Union in Helsinki, Amsterdam School of the Arts, The Actors Platform in London, The Acting Studio in Berlin, Studio Bleu in Paris and Prague Film School.

She has been featured in The Hollywood Reporter, USA Today, MSNBC.com, MTV.com, AccessHollywood.com, and Wired, among others. Follow her on Twitter @lanaveenker.

Complete her survey to be entered into a contest for a free career consultation here.

Link to original article.

Wednesday, June 19, 2013

Zulu 7 Debuts New Footage

by ranielle

Check out this bit of footage from Zulu 7 Productions.  Directed by Timothy Hutton and starring Christian Kane (along with Silas Weir Mitchell!).  Thanks to Paul Bernard for inviting Cast Iron Studios to be a part of the action.  You can see Portland’s own Doren Elias make an appearance at the end!

Thursday, June 13, 2013

Call for Screenplay Submissions; Deadline July 31st

by ranielle

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
JUNE 13, 2013
CONTACT: TALENT[AT]CASTIRONSTUDIOS.COM

CIS Logo 01

CAST IRON STUDIOS SEEKS OREGON STORIES

Casting and Development Company Announces Call for Screenplay Submissions

PORTLAND, ORE. Cast Iron Studios announced today that is seeking feature-length screenplays under 120 minutes that are set in Oregon for development consideration. All genres, excluding horror and sci-fi, are welcome.

This is the first call for screenplays by the Portland, Oregon-based casting company since adding its development division in late 2011. “Things have been simmering behind the scenes at Cast Iron,” says owner and principal Lana Veenker, “and now we’re excited to discover what kind of talent is out there.”

To submit your screenplay, first send a logline, short description, introduction letter and the first 10 pages of your script (UPDATED 6/14/13) to talent[at]castironstudios.com. If there is further interest, you will be sent a release form and a full script will be requested. Unsolicited submissions without signed releases will be discarded. Deadline for submissions is July 31, 2013.

##

UPDATE 6/19/13

We’ve been getting a lot of great questions and wanted to answer them while also keeping them in a centralized location, so here they are!

FAQ

Are you running a screenplay contest?

No. Our call for submissions is not a contest. We are searching for scripts that have development potential.

Why exclude sci-fi or horror scripts?

There may come a time when we are able to include these genres in our call for scripts, but at this time, sci-fi and horror scripts do not fit our business model.

I have a script that is not an Oregon story per se, but it can definitely be set and/or shot in Oregon. Can I still submit?

Our ultimate goal is to find Oregon stories or stories that have an intrinsic relationship to Oregon, but if you’ve got a great story that can be set here, we won’t rule it out right off the bat.

I have a short film script that could be lengthened to feature-length. Do you accept short film scripts?

Please only submit feature-length scripts. We look forward to seeing your short film idea writ large!

Is there a certain budget range that you’re looking for in screenplay submissions?

No, we are not limiting ourselves as to budget at this time.

When do you expect to start production?

We are seeking screenplays with development potential. If and when we select a submission for optioning, further discussion will happen with the writer regarding production.

Will the writer of a project chosen for development be paid for their script?

For any project that is under serious development consideration, appropriate compensation will be negotiated when necessary.

UPDATE 7/10/13

If I submit my screenplay to Cast Iron Studios, am I obligated to work with you?

By no means. If your screenplay is of interest, we will meet to discuss and agree on terms of engagement.

Thursday, June 6, 2013

Cast Iron Studios in Horizon’s in-flight magazine

by ranielle

In the June 2013 Horizon edition of the Alaska Airlines Magazine, Eric Gold explores the Portland locations and local businesses that play an important part in the film and television industry.

The 10-page article features Oregon location scout Roger Faires, Portlandia producer David Cress, the Oscar-nominated animation company LAIKA, prominent animation-industry players Will Vinton, Jim Blashfield, Joan Gratz, Joanna Priestley and Bill Plympton, directors Gus Van Sant and Todd Haynes, Shelly Midthun of the City of Portland, Ray DiCarlo, Chel White and David Daniels of Bent Image Lab, actors Carrie Brownstein, Fred Armisen, Danny Bruno, Robert Blanche, Diego Velazquez and Gabe Nevins, and Vince Porter of the Governor’s Office of Film and Television, among others.

His segment on Cast Iron Studios is excerpted below.

Screen shot 2013-06-05 at 12.27.42 PM

Cast Iron Studios

For live-action needs, many filmmakers and TV producers call Lana Veenker, founder and owner of Cast Iron Studios. The onetime stage actor, originally from Portland, learned casting in Europe, where her employers included a London casting office. When she returned to Portland in 1999, she thought it would be just a pit stop on the way to a bigger city, but “people found out I had done casting and started hiring me,” she says. “Next thing you know, I’ve got a company.”

As casting directors, Veenker and her associates find actors who fit specified parts, then represent producers in contract negotiations with the talent agents who represent the performers. “We’re like the buffer between the creative artists and the money people,” Veenker says. Her firm draws primarily from talent-agency rosters and from its own database of unrepresented local actors, but occasionally uses other methods, such as when it turned to social media to find cast members for Van Sant’s Paranoid Park. Van Sant wanted “real kids,” not movie stars, for his film focused on a high school skateboarder, Veenker says. A post on MySpace invited teenagers ranging from skaters to honor roll students, from shy kids to class clowns, to attend cattle call auditions. The posting drew 2,971 Portland-area teens. One of them, skateboarder Gabe Nevins, landed the lead role.

Generally, out-of-town productions will come to Portland with a few celebrities attached, then hire everyone else locally, Veenker says. The requirements for each role are different and go beyond acting. A director’s preferences, the physical stature of the stars the other actors will play alongside, and stunt ability can all be considerations.

Danny Bruno

A typical episode of a TV series such as Grimm, which Cast Iron Studios handles, could involve five to 20 roles. A feature film could involve 30 or more roles. In recent years, Veenker’s company has cast the gothic phenomenon Twilight; the Harrison Ford film Extraordinary Measures (including casting Portland’s Diego Velazquez in the role of a son); and the romantic comedy Management, starring Jennifer Aniston. Two Portland actors her company cast for Grimm—Danny Bruno (as a beaverlike refrigerator repairman) and Robert Blanche (as a Portland police officer)—have seen their roles evolve into recurring parts. Television commercials for companies such as Nike, Intel, Apple and Facebook keep her staff busy between film and television work.

When not casting, Veenker travels internationally to speak about the industry, and locally, she lobbies legislators in Oregon’s capital of Salem. The industry generally has strong bipartisan support, she says, especially when legislators are able to visit a set. “It’s not just these Hollywood types drinking lattes,” she says. “It’s a lot of local carpenters and electricians. Good jobs.”

Portland's Attributes

Many thanks to Eric Gold for his thorough coverage of Oregon Film & TV!

Link to PDF of ‘Supporting Roles’ article.

Link to full magazine.