Saturday, January 17, 2009

"New Moon" Casting Director Announces Search for Native Americans

by admin

UPDATE: CASTING IS NO LONGER ACCEPTING SUBMISSIONS. THEY HAVE RECEIVED MORE RESPONSES THAN THEY’LL EVER HAVE TIME TO SORT THROUGH.

Casting Director René Haynes recently wrote to tell me the following:

Please tell the fans on our behalf how grateful we are for their enthusiasm and dedication to the project – and explain that (as with all film auditions with overwhelming responses), they will only be contacted if there is further interest.

I will still keep most of the previous post up, so fans can read it, but keep in mind that the casting is closed for submissions. René Haynes also reiterated that it is their GOAL to find Native actors for the Native roles.

Thanks,

Lana

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For months, Twilight fans have been sending us their submissions for the Native American roles in “New Moon,” despite the fact that we have announced on several occasions that we are not casting it.

(We did put out an open casting call for some of the Native American roles in “Twilight,” but since the sequel is shooting in Vancouver, we knew that new casting companies would come on board to hire the actors.)

What a shame, though, for all those contacts to go to waste. We wanted to make sure to pass our resources on to the new casting directors, so after exchanging emails and phone calls with Summit and with the new LA casting company, we were able to talk with the casting director who has been hired specifically to cast the Native American roles.

We’re very excited to announce that the wonderful and supremely qualified René Haynes is helming the Native American casting on “New Moon”.

UPDATE: CASTING IS NO LONGER ACCEPTING SUBMISSIONS. THEY HAVE RECEIVED MORE RESPONSES THAN THEY’LL EVER HAVE TIME TO SORT THROUGH.

    • For the love of Edward, do not attempt to call the casting office.

 

  • Repeat: Do not call the casting office.

 

 

  • One more time? Please, please, please do not call the casting office.

 

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PS: Although the René Haynes call for submissions is now closed, here are a few tips to help you stand out in the crowd when submitting yourself for a film in the future:

CASTING TIPS
We mentioned most of this once before, but it bears repeating:

1. Be professional

The casting company’s job is to find the best and most professional actors for the parts. Your chances of being chosen will increase if you demonstrate that you are reliable, responsive and serious about your acting career.

2. Fit the specs

The film calls for Native American teens and young adults, so that’s whom the casting directors want to see. The most experienced, trained, legal-to-work actors who fit these specs will be given first priority.

In our experience, only after exhausting all possibilities among those who meet the requirements will casting directors begin to consider those who don’t (in this case, great actors who are not Native American, or Native Americans who are not actors).

Reminder: This casting call is for the Native American roles only. Submitting for any other roles in the film will only waste your time and the casting office’s.

3. Follow instructions precisely

* Be sure to include ALL the requested info in your email. Your photo should be recent and should show a clear view of your face. It doesn’t need to be so big that all the casting director sees is your eyeball in her browser window. Typically a 400×600 pixel image will do.

* Please don’t email every other person on the company roster or send multiple emails. Stalkers are quickly eliminated (if you don’t know how to behave and follow instructions in something as simple as an email, how do they know how you’ll behave on set?).

* If it says “no phone calls,” they really, really, really mean it. Please be respectful of their time, their limited number of phone lines and their already heavy work load.

4. Be patient

They love and adore you, but the casting staff often doesn’t have time to respond to requests for updates or sometimes even to confirm that they received your materials. They’ll only get in contact with you when and if there is news. Unfortunately, that means a lot of waiting, but due to time constraints, there’s usually no other alternative.

5. Gain as much experience as you can.

If you don’t have a lot of experience, take some classes, find a mentor, read books and get up to speed on how the industry works, so you come across as a professional. There’s a lot of free info on this blog and in our newsletter that will help you (register on the top right sidebar, if you’re interested). If you happen to be near Portland, Oregon, you can even attend Lana Veenker’s workshop on March 1st. But most importantly, find a way to get some experience.

Hope this helps and best of luck to everyone. We can’t wait to see you on the silver screen.